Digg’s Ultimate Flaw

I don’t post much on tech because it’s usually not my forte, but this is something worth thinking about that Lorelle brought to my attention. Basically if you’re a strong supporter of individualism over horde mentality then this would be something along your lines to read. If you’re considering moving out from the strength of one into the wisdom of crowds, then this is definitely something you should not miss reading.

Remember that many failed social ideologies were based on the the idea of favoring the so-called “wisdom of crowds” over individualism. The reason they failed is because collectivist behavior is dumb behavior and individual judgment is the only way forward.

We need more individuality in society not less.

Quote from Digg’s Biggest Flaw Discovered

In the world of blogs where popularity rises and falls like high school fads and hasbeen celebrities of yesteryears. There is a fine line between hits because the crowd has made you popular and hits because individual people respect you for what you’re writing. You’d think that the majority of people who wrap their lives around blogging would get it. The sad reality is that they are most likely part of the horde.

When you think about it, the ultimate generation of blog content is no longer driven by individual thoughts, knowledge and feelings of the blogger. No, it becomes social trend of what other people are talking about, photocopies of trying to keep up with buzzwords and folksonomies that strip all sense of purity of thought for the few simple hits you may have to satisfy your own narcissism.

Comminuties aren’t built upon horde mentality. Yes, it can be built upon people finding common ground in something that they believe in. At the end of it, the hardest part about a community is to actually work to take so many individual thoughts and ideas and shaping them into a constructive pathway for a future. It’s not something that can be done with a click of a button nor in accomplished in a short space of time. It’s something that not even people in real life have perfected (save for maybe the Ancient Greeks but they didn’t have a day job and they eventually got their butts kicked by the Romans, so ends their story).

Maybe understanding that life goes beyond the narcissistic need for self and peer assurance is one way of bringing out the individual in us all, not just in blogging, but as a living whole. Maybe then choices of what is better could be made more accurately simply because it became our own choice and responsibility and not just a victim of illusionary control. Maybe then, the net for what it is would be a very different place. Maybe that might actually be a good thing.

Even if you don’t think this far deep. It’s still a good read anyway. So think about it.

8 thoughts on “Digg’s Ultimate Flaw

  1. I’m waiting to see if they’ll bury your post too 🙂

    You may want to see the updated post, which includes a “Censored by digg” section.

    “At the end of it, the hardest part about a community is to actually work to take so many individual thoughts and ideas and shaping them into a constructive pathway for a future. It’s not something that can be done with a click of a button nor in accomplished in a short space of time. It’s something that not even people in real life have perfected (save for maybe the Ancient Greeks but they didn’t have a day job and they eventually got their butts kicked by the Romans, so ends their story).”

    I digg!

    Marc

  2. Marc: I think it’s about to be buried soon. I can’t find it on any of the pages except for search. A few hours ago a search of “digg” and “flaw” scored 3 hits. Now I’m the only one left. Conspiracy to hide what they don’t like? Nothing to dispute that either.

    Pat: Or rather Utopian ideals set in a realistic world. You can’t have democracy without stupidity ruining it for everyone. 🙂

  3. Also, the author of the original post about the digg flaw is playing with things by changing the post title every hour or two, as if that will help or hinder the process, I don’t know. I found it titled “The Power of the Schwartz” a few minutes ago, and now it’s something else.

    No matter how you evaluate a system, it takes time to evaluate it properly. Still, this gets you thinking, doesn’t it.

  4. Well, it was back to “For Great Justice, Take Off Every Digg” as the title. I don’t think that’ll work because won’t people be looking at the permalinks rather than the title itself. I know I do.

    It always takes time, we’re not God no matter how good we are. There is no doubt that an idea like Digg is good. It was good from the beginning, but all good intentions have a tendency to backfire on it’s own weight if not properly checked. Unless the top end of Digg expands the way it thinks and monitors, the bottom half will always be made of that horde, which…at the end of it, is never a good thing.

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